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Jesus is my Master. Jesus is the Word of God. Jesus has always been with God. Jesus is the Son of God. I must get this in my heart and soul. The Son of God owns me.

1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was with God in the beginning. 3 All things were created through him, and apart from him not one thing was created that has been created. 4 In him was life, and that life was the light of men. 5 That light shines in the darkness, and yet the darkness did not overcome it.

John 1:1 | Christian Standard Bible. (2017)

What is the good news?

The good news is we have Jesus, the very word of God, in our lives. He has always been there. He was there in the beginning.

Jesus is God. Jesus has redeemed us. We have great and stunning news for the world.

I need to get on with the work of delivering His message of good news and making disciples.

Can we dig deeper?

In the beginning — of all time and created existence, for this Word gave it being (Jn 1:3, 10); therefore, “before the world was” (Jn 17:5, 24); or, from all eternity. Beginning is a starting point, origin or source. The beginning often refers to the time of or before the creation of the world. God is described as the Beginning and the End, denoting the eternity of his existence. Jesus the Messiah’s coming marks a new beginning both for God’s people and, finally, for all creation.

Beginning is from the Greek ἀρχή archē, ar-khay´; a commencement, or  chief (in various applications of order, time, place, or rank):— beginning, corner, (at the, the) first (estate), magistrate, power, principality, principle, rule.

was the Word — He who is to God what man’s word is to himself, the manifestation or expression of himself to those without him. (See on Jn 1:18). On the origin of this most lofty and now for ever consecrated title of the Messiah, this is not the place to speak. It occurs only in the writings of this seraphic apostle. In a mainly nonliterary society the dependability of the spoken word was all-important in law, trade, religion, marriage, and reputation. Receipts, agreements, and records had little general usefulness. Personal integrity and sincere speech were essential to communication, and for most people to self-expression and stable relationships. The words of poets, prophets, storytellers, and instructors were carefully preserved.

Word is from the Greek λόγος lŏgŏs, log´-os; something said (incl. the thought); by implication. a topic (subject of discourse), also reasoning (the mental faculty) or motive; by extension. a computation; the Divine Expression (i.e. the Messiah).

was with God — having a conscious personal existence distinct from God (as one is from the person he is “with”), but inseparable from Him and associated with Him (Jn 1:18; Jn 17:5; 1 Jn 1:2), where “THE FATHER” is used in the same sense as “GOD” here.

was God — in substance and essence GOD; or was possessed of essential or proper divinity. Thus, each of these brief but pregnant statements is the complement of the other, correcting any misapprehensions which the others might occasion.

Was the Word eternal? It was not the eternity of “the Father,” but of a conscious personal existence distinct from Him and associated with Him.

Was the Word thus “with God?” It was not the distinctness and the fellowship of another being, as if there were more Gods than one, but of One who was Himself God—in such sense that the absolute unity of the God head, the great principle of all religion, is only transferred from the region of shadowy abstraction to the region of essential life and love.

But why all this definition? Not to give us any abstract information about certain mysterious distinctions in the Godhead, but solely to let the reader know who it was that in the fulness of time “was made flesh.” After each verse, then, the reader must say, “It was He who is thus, and thus, and thus described, who was made flesh.”

Much as our words reveal to others our hearts and minds, so Jesus the Messiah is God’s “Word” to reveal His heart and mind to us. “He that hath seen Me hath seen the Father” (John 14:9). A word is composed of letters, and Jesus the Messiah is “Alpha and Omega” (Rev. 1:8), the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet. According to Hebrews 1:1–3, Jesus the Messiah is God’s last Word to mankind, for He is the climax of divine revelation.

Jesus the Messiah is the eternal Word (vv. 1–2). He existed in the beginning, not because He had a beginning as a creature, but because He is eternal. He is God and He was with God. “Before Abraham was, I am” (John 8:58).

What does the Logos mean?

Logos is the Greek term translated as “word,” “speech,” “principle,” or “thought.” In Greek philosophy, it also referred to a universal, divine reason or the mind of God.

In the New Testament, the Gospel of John begins, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not anything made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men” (John 1:1-4). Here it is clear that the “Word” or Logos is a reference to Jesus the Messiah.

John argues that Jesus, the Word or Logos, is eternal and is God. Further, all creation came about by and through Jesus, who is presented as the source of life. Amazingly, this Logos came and lived among us: “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14).

John’s Gospel begins by using the Greek idea of a “divine reason” or “the mind of God” to connect with the readers of his day and introduce Jesus to them as God. Greek philosophy may have used the word about divine reason, but John used it to note many of the attributes of Jesus. In John’s use of the Logos concept, we find that:

  • Jesus is eternal (“In the beginning was the Word”)
  • Jesus was with God prior to coming to earth (“the Word was with God”)
  • Jesus is God (“the Word was God.”)
  • Jesus is Creator (“All things were made through him”)
  • Jesus is the Giver of Life (“In him was life”)
  • Jesus became human to live among us (“the Word became flesh and dwelt among us”)

The opening of John’s good news book carries a striking resemblance to Genesis 1:1.

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1).

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him…” (John 1:1).

Logos is used in many ways, yet in John’s book Logos is a clear reference to Jesus, the God who both created us and lived among us. Logos became a theological term important to the disciples in the early church and remains a concept of significant influence today.

What do other Scriptures say?

“In the beginning”

  • Ge 1:1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.,
  • Col 1:18 He is also the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that he might come to have first place in everything.
  • Jn 1:14 The Word became flesh and dwelt among us. We observed his glory, the glory as the one and only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.
  • 1 Jn 1:1 What was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we have observed and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life—
  • Php 2:6 who, existing in the form of God, did not consider equality with God as something to be exploited.
  • Jn 8:38 I speak what I have seen in the presence of the Father;, so then, you do what you have heard from your father.”
  • Jn 17:5 Now, Father, glorify me in your presence with that glory I had with you before the world existed.
  • Ac 26:4 “All the Jews know my way of life from my youth, which was spent from the beginning among my own people and in Jerusalem.
  • Col 1:16 For everything was created by him, in heaven and on earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities— all things have been created through him and for him.
  • Heb 1:2 In these last days, he has spoken to us by his Son. God has appointed him heir of all things and made the universe, through him.

Word” refers to Jesus — Son of God, savior of the world.

  • Jn 1:14 •The Word became flesh and dwelt among us. We observed his glory, the glory as the one and only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.
  • 1 Jn 1:1 What was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we have observed and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life—
  • Re 19:13 He wore a robe dipped in blood, and his name is called the Word of God.
  • Jn 20:28 Thomas responded•• to him, “My Master and my God!”
  • Php 2:6 who, existing in the form of God, did not consider equality with God as something to be exploited.
  • Jn 8:38 I speak what I have seen in the presence of the Father; so then, you do what you have heard from your father.”
  • Jn 17:5 •Now, Father•, glorify me in your presence with that glory I had with you before the world existed.
  • Ac 26:4 “•All •the Jews know my way of life from my youth, which was spent from the beginning among my own people and in Jerusalem.
  • Col 1:16 For everything was created by him, in heaven and on earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities— all things have been created through him and for him.
  • Heb 1:2 In these last days, he has spoken to us by his Son. God has appointed him heir of all things and made the universe, through him.
  • Ro 11:36 For from him and through him and to him are all things. To him be the glory forever. Amen.

Logos – Word

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