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How can I help?

How can I help?

Here is what Jesus did. He didn’t make it easy on himself by avoiding anything. Particularly when it came to people and relationships. He waded right in and He helped out.

So am I strong in the faith? Do I lend a hand to those who are struggling? Or do I just look for the “easy way”?

My approach and attitude should always be, “How can I help?”

God’s goal for us is to help others. We are not here to take care of ourselves. Our mission is love.

May I find how our Father wants me to help!!!

Those of us who are strong and able in the faith need to step in and lend a hand to those who falter, and not just do what is most convenient for us. Strength is for service, not status. Each one of us needs to look after the good of the people around us, asking ourselves, “How can I help? Romans 15:1-4

Paul classified himself with the strong saints as he dealt with a basic problem—selfishness. True Jesus love is not selfish; rather, it seeks to share with others and make others happy. It is even willing to carry the younger disciples, to help them along in their spiritual development. We do not endure them. We encourage them!

Of course, the great example in this is our Master Jesus the Messiah. He paid a tremendous price in order to minister to us. Paul quoted Psalm 69:9 to prove his point. Does a strong disciple  think he is making a great sacrifice by giving up some food or drink? Then let him measure his sacrifice by the sacrifice of Jesus. No sacrifice we could ever make could match Calvary.

A person’s spiritual maturity is revealed by his discernment. He is willing to give up his rights that others might be helped. He does this, not as a burden, but as a blessing. Just as loving parents make sacrifices for their children, so the mature believer sacrifices to help younger disciples grow in the faith.

Paul shared the two sources of spiritual power from which we must draw if we are to live to please others: the Word of God and prayer. We must confess that we sometimes get impatient with younger disciples, just as parents become impatient with their children. But the Word of God can give us the “patience and encouragement” that we need. Paul closed this section praying for his readers, that they might experience from God that spiritual unity that He alone can give.

This suggests to us that the local church must major in the Word of God and prayer. The first real danger to the unity of the church came because the Apostles were too busy to minister God’s Word and pray. When they found others to share their burdens, they returned to their proper ministry, and the church experienced harmony and growth.

The result of this is, of course, glory to God. Disunity and disagreement do not glorify God; they rob Him of glory. Abraham’s words to Lot are applicable to today: “Let there be no strife, I pray thee, between me and thee … for we be brethren” (Gen. 13:8). The neighbors were watching! Abraham wanted them to see that he and Lot were different from them because they worshiped the true God. In His prayer in John 17, Jesus prayed for the unity of the church to the glory of God (John 17:20–26).

Receive one another; edify one another; and please one another—all to the glory of God.